Nation of Migrants, Historians of Migration and A part and Apart: Asian American and Immigration History

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Nation of Migrants, Historians of Migration

Nation of Migrants, Historians of Migration by Adam Goodman examines this nation of immigrants myth in showing the growth of the term migration over immigration. Goodman discusses how this idea of nation of immigrants has always been seen as European immigrants. Historians have constantly left out non-European immigrants when discussing immigration. However he argues that this has changed in which historians have expanded their focus beyond European immigrants. This focus is because of the growth of the term “migration” instead of solely focusing on the term “immigration”. Goodman argues that the term migration provides a focus on different migrant groups who traveled to America instead of only focusing on European immigrants making up the immigrant population of America. Furthermore, Goodman shows that by looking at groups who migrated to America rather than immigration shifts our emphasis from American exceptionalism to that fact that the United States is a nation of many migrants.

 

A Part and Apart: Asian American and Immigration History

A Part and Apart: Asian American and Immigration History by Erika Lee discusses her table experience at a meeting with some of the most popular immigration historians and ethnic scholars. Her essay is about this problem of how to reconcile European immigration historiography with ethnic studies on African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos. She particularly focuses on the gap in opinion between George Sanchez and Rudi Vecoli. Sanchez’s argument is that different groups of immigrants have different experiences based on when they immigrated. He focuses on how experiences of Immigrants are subjected to change over the years. Vecoli’s argument focused on ethnicity over race in terms of studying immigration history. This argument between Vecoli and Sanchez as well as her discussion of Asian American history was to show this divide in ethnic studies scholars and immigration historians when studying Immigration history. She concludes that this divide can be fixed by integrating more insights from broader fields as well as looking at questions through new approaches.

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